List of Books Read 2010

I have read a total of 35 1/2  books on this blog.
You maybe thinking only 35 1/2 books? The 1/2 is the Eudora Welty book that I've not finished.
I have 2 other blogs: @ A Well-Watered Garden the total count is 61------
@ A Garden of Books the total count is 52.
That means so far this year I've read a whopping----148 1/2 books! That astounds even me! And to think I had no idea until I added all of them up today!

Non-Fiction:
1. Facing Learning Disability In The Adult Years by Jean Shapiro and Rebecca Rich
2. The Little Guide To Your Well-Read Life by Steve Leveen
3. The Blood of Lambs by Kamal Saleem
4. How To Read A Book, The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading by Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren
5. The Time of My Life by Patrick Swayze and Lisa Niemi
6. And If I Perish, Front-line U. S. Army Nurses In World War II by Evelyn M. Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee
7. With The Old Breed by E. B. Sledge
8. The Secret Holocaust Diaries, The Untold Story of Nonna Bannister by Nonna Bannister with Denise George and Carolyn Tomlin
9. German Boy, A Child in War by Wolfgang W. E. Samuel
10. The Lost, A Search For Six Of Six Million by Daniel Mendelsohn
11. Jane's Fame, How Jane Austen Conquered The World by Claire Harman
12. Charlemagne by Derek Wilson
13. A Short History of Scotland by Richard Killeen
14. 1215 The Year of Magna Carta by Danny Danziger and John Gillingham
15. How The Irish Saved Civilization, The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role From The Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe by Thomas Cahill
16. The Lady in the Tower, The Fall of Anne Boleyn by Alison Weir
17. The Lives of the Kings and Queens of England edited by Antonia Fraser
18. How To Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster
19. 13 Cent Killers The 5th Marine Snipers in Vietnam by John J. Culbertson
20. Semper Cool, One Marine's Fond Memories of Vietnam by Barry Fixler
21. Historical Atlas of Britain, The End of the Middle Ages to the Georgian Era by Jeremy Black

Fiction:
1. The Pearl by John Steinbeck
2. The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty (have read 1/2 of the stories in the book)
3. Serena by Ron Rash
4. All Quiet On The Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
5. Becoming Jane Eyre by Sheila Kohler
6. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows
7. The Help by Kathryn Stockett
8. Precious by Sapphire
9. A Matter of Class by Mary Balogh
10. Murder on Lexington Avenue--A Gaslight Mystery by Victoria Thompson
11. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
12. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
13. The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender
14. Girl In A Blue Dress by Gaynor Arnold
15. Dr. Zhivago by Boris Pasternak

I read more non-fiction books this year because of the books on the World War II time period, plus books I read on British history. Most recently I've read 2 books on the Vietnam War---I'm scrambling to finish a 3rd.

I have 1 book that I am reading on my Kindle for Charles Weinblatt--Jacob's Courage, I am hoping to have this book reviewed in the new year.

Of the non-fiction books that were most memorable to me:
With The Old Breed by E. B. Sledge---after watching The Pacific on HBO, I had to read this memoir. This book is a testament to a young Marine that did more than give his all, he a testament of sacrifice for all of the freedoms that we so often take for granted.
And If I Perish, Front-line U. S. Army Nurses In World War II by Evelyn M. Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee----Nurses that were not afraid of doing whatever was necessary to provide nursing care to our military in harms way.
German Boy, A Child in War by Wolfgang W. E. Samuel. I will not forget this boy who was just a child during World War II. He was not responsible for the violent onslaught of Nazi Germany, yet he certainly paid a heavy price.
The Lost, A Search For Six Of Six Million by Daniel Mendelsohn. One mans search for his family that were lost amongst so many Jews that were murdered by the Nazi's.  

Of the fiction that was most memorable to me:
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and The Help by Kathryn Stockett would be at the top of my list in fiction.They are both books with strong characters, strong story, and a strong social and moral statement.
Serena by Ron Rash had the best villain I've read in a long time (fiction that is).
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows, is a great story that stays with you. It is a story that shares with the readers what the people in England went through during the Blitz by Germany, and during the occupation of Guernsey island.
Precious by Sapphire was so gut wrenching I cried.
All Quiet On The Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque was a haunting war....not a story....but the reality of war.

I am looking forward to 2011 and what new books I'll read!
Stay tuned for a review on Historical Atlas of Britain by Jeremy Black and The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien.

Blissful Reading!
Annette

Comments

  1. I rarely make lists myself but enjoy reading other people's. You really read some fantastic books this year, and a good variety in both fiction and non-fiction.

    ReplyDelete
  2. We are a not-for-profit educational organization, founded by Mortimer Adler and we have recently made an exciting discovery--three years after writing the wonderfully expanded third edition of How to Read a Book, Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren made a series of thirteen 14-minute videos--lively discussing the art of reading. The videos were produced by Encyclopaedia Britannica. For reasons unknown, sometime after their original publication, these videos were lost.

    Three hours with Mortimer Adler on one DVD. A must for libraries and classroom teaching the art of reading.

    I cannot exaggerate how instructive these programs are--we are so sure that you will agree, if you are not completely satisfied, we will refund your donation.

    Please go here to see a clip and learn more:

    http://www.thegreatideas.org/HowToReadABook.htm

    ISBN: 978-1-61535-311-8

    Thank you,

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    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm not sure how many books you read for the challenge, but there are 3 giveaways up for participants of the Vietnam War Reading Challenge. I hope you'll enter and spread the word.

    ReplyDelete

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