Book Review: Search The Dark, by Charles Todd

Search The Dark is the third book in the inspector Ian Rutledge series.
The time period is August 1919. 
Inspector Ian Rutledge is called by Scotland Yard to a small town named Singleton Magna. The town is south of London and near the coast. A woman has been brutally beaten by a blunt object on her head. It is considered to be an aggressive passionate murder. A World War I veteran named Bert Mowbray has been arrested. He had been on a train traveling to a job opportunity, he saw a woman and two children that looked like his own family. While he was at war his family had died by a bombing in London. They were presumed dead. Yet, this woman and children remind him of his own beloved and missed family. He reacts with dramatic zeal, desperately looking for them in Singleton Magna. When a woman is found murdered, the police believe Mowbray is the murderer.

A murder can not be solved in the first few pages of the book, so I felt Mowbray may not be the correct criminal behind bars.
The story follows through with an investigation of a wealthy family that is about to open a museum. These people are a thorn to Ian Rutledge's ability to investigate. They act aloof. They cannot understand why they would need to be questioned. They take the investigation lightly, at least in the beginning chapters.

This is a great mystery story. I was not let down, nor bored, nor confused by the fast and busy story.
Once again, I am a having a splendid time reading this series.
   
I did something different while reading Search The Dark. I tried to imagine the story being made in to a movie, a BBC adaption. I believe Jude Law would be excellent, cast as inspector Ian Rutledge. Plus he's handsome.

Published by St. Martin's Press 1999
279 pages
Mystery/Historical Fiction Mystery/World War I/Early 20th Century/War Through The Generations Challenge

Link @ Barnes and Nobles:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/search-the-dark-charles-todd/1100269606
Both Nook and Paperback are $7.99

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