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Showing posts from July, 2013

[Review] The Age of Ice by J. M. Sidorova

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Title: The Age of Ice
Author: J. M. Sidorova
Publisher: Scribner, A Division of Simon and Schuster, In. July 23, 2013
Genre: Fiction
Theme: Russian man immune to cold.
Format: Hardcover
Age: Adult
Pages: 416
Source: Free copy from Scribner for the purpose of review
Rating: 3 1/2 Stars

Summary:
In St. Petersburg, Russia, twin boys are born to parents that were imprisoned in an ice palace in 1740. The boys are named Andrei and Alexander. Andrei is the older, bolder, goal-oriented brother. His heart is set on being a Lieb Guard. Alexander had followed his brother at every point in their growing up years, oddly enough it is Alexander that passes up his brother in height and achievement in the guard. While still a youth Alexander discovers his "gift." "Arousal, rage, fear, even joy," his body's response is cold. His embrace and kiss, is like ice. His body's reaction or non-reaction to cold helps him in the wintry weather of Russia, but it does not help him in …

[Review] Survivors, True Stories of Children in the Holocaust by Allan Zullor and Mara Bovsun

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Title: Survivors, True Stories of Children in the Holocaust
Author: Allan Zullo and Mara Bovsun
Publisher: Scholastic 2004
Genre: Non-fiction
Theme: Survivors of Holocaust
Format: Paperback
Age: Age 8 and up. ***I disagree with the age. I have a 9 year old granddaughter that is not ready for this book. I believe 10 would be a better age, a mature 10. An adult nearby that is willing to talk about the book with child would be beneficial.
Pages: 208
Source: Self-purchase
Rating: 5 Stars
Summary:
Survivors, True Stories of Children in the Holocaust, are the stories of eight children who survived the Holocaust. Their names are: Luncia Gamzer from Poland, Herbert Karliner from Germany, Markus Reich from Poland, George Levy from Germany, Walter Ziffer from Poland, Sarah Engelberg from Poland, Mathei Jackel from Romania, Jack Gruener from Poland.

My Thoughts:
Whenever I write a review on a Holocaust story I refuse to express the words, "I loved this story," because I feel that wo…

Book Blogger Hop: July 26-August 1

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This weeks question submitted by Elizabeth @ Silver's Reviews.

"How do you organize your books to be read?"

I have two baskets near my reading chair that hold the current books I'm reading. I have one basket for all Christian fiction and non-fiction. I have a second basket for all other type books. I have book reviews scheduled through September. It helps to have them grouped this way as well as a calendar nearby for when they are due. As for my own pleasure reading I do not schedule too far in advance as I change my mind often. I have an "idea" as to what I want to read, but even then some books get bumped because I choose to read something else. 
Of course on my eReader it's unorganized. I'm hoping that Amazon will create a way in one of their next upgrades to have a filesystem for eBooks. 









[Review] East of Eden by John Steinbeck

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Title: East of Eden
Author: John Steinbeck (1902-1968) and Introduction by David Wyatt
Publisher: Penguin Classic 1992, first published 1952.
Genre: Fiction
Theme: Saga of two families in Salinas Valley, California.
Format: Paperback
Age: Adult
Pages: 602
Rating: 5 Stars
Source: Self-purchased
Summary:
East of Eden is about two families that live in Salinas Valley, California. The Trask family and the Hamilton family. The Trask family is the main focus of the book. The Hamilton family is a companion so to speak for the story. Adam Trask's story begins before the Civil War. After the war, Adam left the family farm in Connecticut with his new wife and moves to Salinas Valley. The Hamilton's emigrated from Ireland to Salinas Valley. The Hamilton's labor hard on their land to create a ranch and livelihood for their large family. Samuel Hamilton is the patriarch. He is larger than life, self-made and capable. Adam Trask and his new wife seem out of place. Adam is dismissive with…

[Review] The New Well-Tempered Sentence, A Punctuation Handbook for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed by Karen Elizabeth Gordon

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Title: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, A Punctuation Handbook for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed
Author: Karen Elizabeth Gordon
Publisher: Mariner September 19, 2003/First published in 1983 and then again in 1993.
Genre: Non-fiction
Theme: Punctuation
Format: Paperback
Age: Adult or young adult
Rating: 4 1/2 Stars
Source: Self-purchase

I found out about this book when I read Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss. The New Well-Tempered Sentence was used as a reference for Truss's book.

Summary:
Gordon's book, The New Well-Tempered Sentence is unique, with edgy illustrations and a coquette style of writing. Gordon makes learning punctuation fun. Can punctuation be fun? Yes, with the right teacher. Karen Gordon breaks up the monotony of learning with unique drawings and dry humor. Punctuation is divided into chapters: exclamation point, question mark, period, comma, semicolon, colon, hyphen, dash, italics, parentheses, brackets, slash, and the apostrophe.

My Thoughts…

[Review] The Mountains Between by Julie McGowan

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Title: The Mountains Between
Author: Julie McGowan
Publisher: Second publication November 2012 by Sunpenny
Genre: Fiction
Theme: Jennie and Harry grow up living on opposite sides of a mountain in Wales.
Format: pdf
Age: Adult
Pages: 905KB, 398 pages
Rating: 4 1/2 Stars
Source: pdf given to me for free by Sunpenny for purpose of review.

Summary:
Time span of story 1929-1949. 
On one side of the Blorenge mountain lives the Davies family. Jennie Davies is the youngest child of a faithful dairy farmer. She has a brother and two sisters. Their mother Katharine is a harsh and bitter woman. Katharine wears a pious mask, but beneath she has a heart of lust. Katharine uses Jennie as a scapegoat, all her anger and frustration is aimed at Jennie. The Davies live near the town of Abergavenny
Harry Jenkins lives on the other side of the mountain with his family in the mining town of Blaenavon. They are a close-nit mining family. His mother is a woman of noble character. Harry has two brother…

Review: Time Fall by Timothy Ashby

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Title: Time Fall Author: Timothy Ashby Publisher: Author Planet Press June 4, 2013 Genre: Fiction Theme: US Rangers during World War II travel in time. Format: Paperback Age:Adult
ISBN:978-1939990150 Pages: 356 pages
Source: Free copy from Nikki Leigh, Book Promotion Services and Tim Ashby. 
Rating: 4 Stars
Summary: 
April 1945
Ranger Lt. Arthur Sutton is in command of five US Rangers. They board a C-47 transport plane. Their mission is to parachute into an assigned drop zone over enemy territory-Nazi Germany.After leaving the plane, time shifts forward and they drop into the year 2011. Unaware of the change, they continue with their assigned mission. During the process they are faced with incredible evidence that nearly 70 years have passed. Meanwhile, old enemies and political beliefs have not changed;some hardened soldiers refuse to give up their pogrom.

My Thoughts:
I enjoyed reading this book for several reasons all leading me to rate this book 4 stars.
It is a creative approach to a World Wa…

Review: Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss

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Title: Eats, Shoots and Leaves, The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation
Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher: Gotham Books 2004
Genre: Non-fiction
Theme: Punctuation
Format: Hardcover
Age: Adult
Pages: 209
Rating: 4 Stars
Source: I won this book several years ago by answering a random question on a blog. I've had this book such a long time I don't remember who I won it from.

Summary:
With a dry wit author Lynne Truss teaches correct punctuation. She's called herself a stickler for correct punctuation. She's shocked at a world where people do not care about punctuation or they're afraid of it. Truss teaches: apostrophes, commas, colons, semi-colons, questions marks, exclamation marks, italics and hyphens.

My Thoughts:
I read this book in one day. Lynne Truss makes punctuation fun. She's light-hearted and witty in expressing her views on bad grammar. This is a beginning book on this subject. I do not feel it is an end-all book on punctuation. It gave me a solid star…

Book Blogger Hop: July 12th-18th, 2013

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This weeks question courtesy of Elizabeth @ Silver's Reviews. Thanks Elizabeth.

"How long have you been blogging?" I began blogging and book reviewing in January 2007 over at Wordpress. I had zero idea what I was doing. After a few months of stumbling on Wordpress I moved over to Blogger in May 2007. In September of 2007 another blog was created for Christian book reviews. After moving to Blogger things began to come together. I studied other blogs and worked on a vision. Blogging is a work in progress. It is not something that can become stagnant and it cannot be ignored. Every year new goals are made. Often I study other blogs and think about how things should be adapted or completely changed on my blogs. Grammar is a tough thing for me, it does not come easy. Reading books on grammar, as well as reading websites and blogs that focus on grammar, have been a big help. I no longer fear grammar, I've grown to embrace it. The newest goal is to be a critical editor (a k…

Review: The Promise of Provence by Patricia Sands

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Title: The Promise of Provence
Author: Patricia Sands
Publisher: CreateSpace May 30, 2013
ISBN: 9780991931316
Genre: Fiction:
Labels: France, Canada, Romance, Travel
Format: eBook, Kindle
Age: Adult
Pages: 457, Kindle is 629KB
Rating: 4 Stars

Summary:
Katherine, age 55, is a research assistant for a physician in Toronto, Canada. Katherine, is the only child of parents who left Europe post World War II and emigrated to Canada. Katherine's been married to James for twenty-two years. Katherine is a structured gal, an analyzer, detail-oriented. Upon coming home from work one day and anticipating a shared evening with her husband to celebrate their wedding anniversary, she finds a note that changes her life.
The Promise of Provence, is about Katherine's chance to get out of her little hobbit hole she's lived in for many years. Steady and dependable Katherine is given an opportunity for travel and adventure. She's given an opportunity to make a fresh change in her life.


My…

Review: Flames in the Field The Story of Four S.O.E. Agents in Occupied France by Rita Kramer

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Title: Flames in the Field The Story of Four SOE Agents in Occupied France
Author: Rita Kramer
Publisher: Penguin November 21, 2011
Genre: Non-fiction
Labels: S.O.E. Agents, French Resistance, World War II, France, Great Britain, England, Spy, Nazi Germany, Espionage, MI6, MI5
Format: eBook Kindle
Age: Adult
Pages: 368 in paperback, 2188 KB in Kindle
Rating: 5 Stars

Summary:
Four young women who were S.O.E. agents were murdered by Nazi's at a French camp in 1944. Little was known about them, in how they came to be arrested and how they died. Vera Atkins had been a British intelligence officer during World War II. She'd known these women and trained them. Author Rita Kramer, began her book by giving evidence on how she came to know about these women, her research, and interviews with Vera Atkins and other's who'd known them. Flames in the Field, morphed into more than just telling the story of these four women, but the intelligence and counter-intelligence used during …