(Review) Agincourt: The Story of a Battle by Rosemary Hawley Jarman

Publisher: Amberley Books, July 2, 2012.
Genre: Non-fiction, Agincourt Battle, Henry V, British History Reading Challenge 2014.
Format: pdf, ebook/Kindle.
Pages: 158.
Rating: 5 stars for excellent.
Source: I was given a free pdf copy from Amberley Books, later I bought an e-book Kindle copy.

To purchase a copy @ Amazon.
Waterstones. 

Further links of interest:
Eyewitness History
British Battles
History Channel
Wikipedia



Summary:
The battlefield of Agincourt is located near modern day Azincourt, France. Azincourt is in far northern France. Agincourt is one of the battles in the Hundred Year's War, 1337-1453. It was an English victory.
October 25, 1415, Henry V and his army engaged in battle with a large French army. Henry V's English army had been joined by a battled hardened group of Welshmen, and a group of intimidating Irishmen. The English victory came on St. Crispin's Day. Henry did not take credit for the victory, but gave glory to God.




My Thoughts:
When I began reading Agincourt, I knew it had been an important battle in English history, but I did not know anything else beyond this detail. Rosemary Hawley Jarman has written a splendid concise study of Agincourt.
My reasons for a 5 star review:

  • Dating back to the period of Edward III in order to lay the groundwork and reasons for the battle. 
  • The history of the mad French king and the tumultuous French region. 
  • Lengthy list of the men who fought in the battle. This includes important historical notes of interest of each person. 
  • From the landing of Henry V and his army, to the battle at Agincourt is examined. 
  • A list of everyone who was involved, from knights to archers, from carpenters to friars, from tent-makers to the king's household. 
  • The prolific sickness that came from eating mussels in a sewage drain. 
  • A descriptive recreation of the battle.
  • The armor and weaponry is examined. 
  • The aftermath and legacy. 



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