War and Peace Read-a-Long: Week Ten


Week ten is over Book 13.

1)  The only bit of this week's war-themed escapades that I really took in was a small section where it got interesting and the Russians started getting ready to attack the French but then got confused because they couldn't find somebody or other so they did it the next day and botched it again because they went crazy and just started trying to beat on some French people.  Does anybody feel as though they're learning?
I did not know that the French had occupation of Moscow for a time. I know little about this period of history in regards to Russian history or Napoleon. I found it interesting. I also enjoyed reading Tolstoy's philosophical explanation of historians who have written on the war. 

2)  Clearly Tolstoy's not a Napoleon fan - as far as Tolstoy's concerned, he's lucky at best. Thoughts?
I would be shocked if Tolstoy had been a fan of Napoleon. 

3)  According to Shmoop, Pierre's only been in prison for four weeks.  And in four weeks he's decided to completely re-write his personality while shedding some pounds.  I've been surprised by how well Tolstoy has portrayed the French's treatment of their prisoners.  Maybe he's not so biased after all? [I realize that's not technically a question but I'm late so we're going with it]
I believe Tolstoy handled his "bias" well. He has written as fair and balanced of a story (of his country and history) as can be portrayed. 

4)  This might be a ridiculous question given that some of you may not be flying by the seat of your pants and only just staying caught up (like nobody around here, obviously) but is anybody else worried that the final two books are going to be all about Napoleon trudging back across Russia and that we're only going to get back to the characters we actually care about in retrospect when we hit the Epilogues?!
I am tired of reading about war. I'm hoping to have closure with the characters 

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